Cerebral Palsy

The definition and classification of cerebral of cerebral palsy have always been a source of great confusion and controversy. The term itself is somewhat misleading: whereas, CEREBRAL appropriately emphasizes the importance of the brain, PALSY is an anachronism that in modern parlance is usually associated with paralysis which suggests a complete loss of movement (not typical of cerebral palsy).

There are so many definition of cerebral palsy; there are three recurrent elements that provide the basis for a concise definition. 

  1. There is a significant problem with motor function. 
  2. This motor impairment results from something that went wrong with the brain during its early development. 
  3. The disturbance of typical brain development occurred over a discrete period of time and does not represent a continuing, recurrent or progressive process.

So cerebral palsy is considered as;

A MOTOR IMPAIRMENT SYNDROME

Regardless of the specific cause, or etiology all people with the cerebral palsy have a significant problem with controlling movement and posture.

A RESULT OF DISTURBANCE OR ANOMALY IN EARLY BRAIN DEVELOPMENT
The brain grows most rapidly and develops most profoundly during the prenatal period and continues to grow rapidly during the early postnatal years. Insult prior to 3 years of age results in neurological impairments and motor outcomes - such as Cerebral Palsy - that are characteristic of injury to the immature brain. An arbitrary upper age limit of 5 or 6 years has been suggested for assigning the diagnosis of CEREBRAL PALSY.

A RESULT OF NON PROGRESSIVE INSULT OR ANOMALIES

Although the motor impairment and functional consequences of cerebral palsy may change and even worsen with time, the underlying brain anomaly that initially caused the motor impairment does not.

"Cerebral Palsy is an umbrella term covering a group of non-progressive, but often changing motor impairment syndromes secondary to lesions or anomalies of the brain arising in the early stages of its development."

PREVALENCE
The prevalence of all forms of cerebral palsy in the General World population has varied from 1 in 300-400 live births.


CP Symptoms

CP Causes

CP Associated Disorders

CP Types

CP Tests & Diagnosis

CP Treatment

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